What to Know About Sleep Apnea and Its Consequences

  • Snoring
  • 990

Sleep apnea might go undetected for a while. It might very well go undiagnosed for even longer. You might not know the systems or you might be thinking you feeling tired throughout the day is normal or for another reason.

But you might want to listen to your body if you are feeling tired or find yourself falling asleep a lot in situations you aren’t intending to. And if after thinking about it, you do find yourself thinking it might in fact be sleep apnea, go visit a doctor.

This article goes into detail about some of the symptoms you might be experiencing and also the importance if you feel you might have sleep apnea to get a proper diagnosis. 

There’s a constellation of symptoms, starting with unrestorative sleep no matter how long you sleep. Even if you try to sleep more on weekends, you still wake up feeling unrefreshed. The fractured sleep results in feeling like you’ve stayed up all night.

Perhaps most telling: You are sleepy during the day, especially when you’re sedentary. Take notice if you fall asleep within 10 minutes at a movie, play or concert or when watching TV. You get up four or more times a night to urinate (men, it may not be your prostate!). You wake up in the morning with a very dry mouth or a headache. You’re moody, irritable and have difficulty concentrating. Your reaction time and speed at performing tasks slows as if you are five years older than you really are.

And if you’d rather not base your suspicions on symptoms alone, you might invite a close friend to share a room with you for a night or two and ask in the morning if the friend heard or was awakened by your snoring and noticed whether your noisy inspiration of air followed a seemingly prolonged stoppage of breathing. The snoring doesn’t have to be loud to be a symptom of sleep apnea, but it’s likely to be irregular and interspersed with quiet pauses.

A proper diagnosis can be a problem for the millions of Americans who lack easy access to a sleep lab, often located at major medical centers, or don’t have insurance coverage for a needed sleep study.

Sleep apnea can be effectively treated with a nighttime device called CPAP, for continuous positive airway pressure, a machine that provides constant positive pressure when the sleeper breathes in and out. It uses a mask that must be properly applied to form a tight seal around the nose and mouth.

Rate

0 out of 5 stars(0 ratings)

Asda Selling £12 Anti-Snore Pillow and It’s Receiving Extremely Good Reviews

Stuffed-nosed snorers and long-suffering sleep-deprived partners, assemble! Have a whip round because ASDA is selling a £12 reprieve to your nighttime noise problems, according to a lot of customers who have given a new anti-snoring pillow rave reviews. With sleep at a premium, the pillow obviously costs a little more than your basic headgear, but […]

Read more
closeup photo of person's hand

“Saved by a Snore”: Man ‘Wakes up on Mortuary Slab After Being Declared Dead by Three Doctors’

A 29-year-old prisoner woke up on an autopsy table after being declared dead by three doctors just a few hours before, according to reports. Gonzalo Montoya, who was convicted of theft of junk, was certified dead on Sunday in a cell at the Penitentiary Center of Asturias where he is serving his sentence in Asturias, […]

Read more

New Study Finds Nearly Half of Truck Drivers Could Potentially Have Sleep Apnea

Trucking news and briefs for Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2021:  A 2020 study released by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute found that nearly half of truck drivers are at risk for obstructive sleep apnea. This table compares drivers tested for OSA using commercial driver medical exam (CDME) data compared to the STOP-Bang (SB) sleep apnea screening […]

Read more

Share Great Content for Our Resource Section

About

Napping.com provides the latest news, information and expert articles related to sleep, sleep research, napping and better health and wellness. We welcome visitors to share useful resources for our Editorial Team.

Have a suggestion? Send us an email at: contact@napping.com

Navigation

Suggest Content

Napping.com