Why Snoring Is Bad for Your Health? Real Cardiovascular Risks

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Snoring Is Bad for Your Health?

Snoring affects approximately 45% of the adult population at one time or another. The occasional snore might be attributed to recent weight gain or consumption of alcohol. However, those suffering from consistent snoring and sleep apnea have reasons to get it checked by a doctor or sleep study. 

Sleep is critical in maintaining a healthy body, alertness and cardiovascular health. Unfortunately, snoring can lead to underlying health conditions like high blood pressure and stroke. This is due to the lack of oxygen that can occur while you are sleeping. 

HealthWorksCollection published an article that details the health risks and reasons why individuals should see their doctor if they suspect sleep issues. 

FACT: Snoring Is Bad for Your Health

Millions of people snore when they sleep. It’s a condition that is often thought of whimsically, but is snoring bad for you? Click here to find out.

Over 90 million Americans admit to snoring at night. People all over are wondering, “Is snoring bad?”

The answer might shock you.

At least 37 million Americans deal with snoring as a regular issue. Sure, it’s a nuisance to those sleeping nearby, but is it an actual health issue?

Snoring Is Bad for Your Health

Here’s what you should know about “sawing logs” in your sleep:

Snoring 101

Snoring is basically noisy breathing. It occurs when the air flow through the mouth and nose gets obstructed.

People tend to snore more as they age because their body becomes relaxed and loses muscle tone. This includes the throat and tongue muscles, which fall back into your airways and cause obstructions.

These obstructions produce snoring.

Your weight also has an effect on snoring. Many people wonder, “Why do fat people snore?” Being overweight makes your throat tissue bulky and poor muscle tone, which leads to snoring.

Alcohol consumption and smoking further relax the throat and tongue muscles, causing snores to happen. Nasal and sinus problems also cause snoring. Even your sleep posture can contribute to snoring.

Does Snoring Have a Direct Impact on Cardiovascular Health?

Snoring and exercise impact cardiovascular health. Studies suggest that chronic snoring can increase the risk of cardiovascular issues such as high blood pressure and heart disease. Regular exercise can help reduce snoring and improve overall cardiovascular health by promoting better sleep and reducing excess weight.

Is Snoring Bad?

Now, you’re probably wondering, “Is Snoring bad for you? Is snoring dangerous?” Snoring isn’t necessarily dangerous. Snoring problems can often be remedied with reduced alcohol/cigarette consumption or a change in sleeping posture.

Cultural attitudes towards snoring effect how we perceive it. In other cultures (like India), people snoring is viewed as an indication of getting a sound sleep.

Habitual snorers, however, are at increased risk for sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is when you stop breathing for a short time during your sleep. This includes extended periods of 10+ seconds.

To read the original article, visit HealthWorksCollection.

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